How to Learn Energy Healing

If you’re interested in learning energy healing, hopefully you’ve done some research as to the different modalities that exist. If you haven’t, I strongly suggest you do. There are a number of different types of energy healing, and what works and resonates for one person might not work or resonate for someone else. Don’t choose instruction in any specific modality solely because it’s the one you’ve heard of. Do some online reading. Ask people you know who receive energy healing sessions, or who practice energy healing. If you choose to learn healing–actually, if you choose to learn anything–for no reason other than that someone else said you should, or it’s the one thing you know about, you might find yourself learning something that doesn’t resonate for you and therefore doesn’t work for anyone with whom you practice.

Now, let’s say you’ve done the research, and you’ve decided on a modality. For the purposes of this blog post, since I practice and teach Chios, I’ll use that as the example.

So you want to learn Chios. You’re really excited about it. You can’t wait to get started. The Chios website has a list of Certified Chios Master Teachers, and you’ve found one in your area. Sounds good, right?

Maybe. Maybe not. There are some things to consider when you’re choosing an instructor.

First, how and where do they practice? Some Chios Master Teachers, like me, have a business that includes giving Chios sessions and teaching Chios. Others do it as an occasional thing. Still others do it as a hobby. There isn’t anything wrong with any of those, but you’ll want to choose an instructor who is somewhat aligned with what you want to do with Chios when you’ve learned it. The way we practice can influence our teaching; if, for example, you want to start a business, but your instructor is of the opinion that no one should charge or accept money for energy healing, you might find yourself at odds with them and therefore not learn as effectively.

Second, how much experience do they have? A Certified Master Teacher has worked their way through all three levels of Chios instruction, hopefully under the supervision of another CCMT. So they are more than likely to be qualified to teach. But someone who has not had students at all is still refining their instruction method. You might be okay with that, or you might prefer someone who has a track record with other students. Either is fine, but you’ll want an instructor who matches what you’re looking for.

Third, what do you actually get from them? All instruction isn’t created equal. Although Chios states that instructors should not just give attunements and then set their students loose to learn on their own, some do exactly that. Some are available to answer a student’s questions while the student is learning, but don’t do any other instruction. Some have regular meetings with the student to discuss their progress, but the student goes through the material at their own pace.

Personally, I (and I’m sure other instructors as well) offer the “at their own pace” option, but I also offer directed instruction, and that’s what all of my current students chose. Some people find it easier to make progress with an instructor who gives them specific assignments. I meet with my students once a week to go over their progress and assignments and give them the following week’s assignment, and I’m always available by email to answer questions or address concerns. I also teach some additional information about the human energy system.

My new students are required to have a Chios session before I give them their first attunement, and an additional session before they complete Level 1; those are part of the instruction so don’t cost the students anything extra. Students also get a discount on any additional sessions they have while they’re my students. If a student is certified as a Healing Practitioner (Level 2) or CCMT (Level 3) and goes into practice, I’ll link to them on my website and will refer clients or students to them if my schedule is full or if I feel like they would be a better fit.

I don’t only teach Chios to my students. I also work with them on their mindset, helping them identify and work past blocks that might prevent them from learning, or accepting what they learn, or that might hinder them if they plan to go into practice themselves. Energy healing doesn’t exist in a vacuum; both having healing sessions and learning to give them requires more work than just lying on a table or reading a book, and I support my students through all of those pieces.

There are a wide range of possibilities of what you’ll receive from a Chios instructor. It’s important to find one who teaches the way you need to learn, and offers what you need.

What an instructor charges might also be a consideration for you, but bear in mind that the investment for working with any given instructor might be based on what they offer for instruction and on how much experience they have.

Fourth, and the most important consideration, is whether you and they are a good fit to work together. In addition to the things I’ve already mentioned, personality plays a role. Some people just plain rub each other the wrong way. You may want to work with someone whose ethics and philosophies are similar to yours. You’ll want someone who explains things in a way you can understand.

You’ll also want someone who feels like a fit. This is energy work, and energy and “gut feelings” matter. If you speak to a potential instructor and leave the conversation feeling angry, or out of sorts, or like you’ve been punched in the gut, that probably isn’t someone you want to work with. Everyone has their own energetic vibration, and when you’re around someone whose vibration is too far off from yours, it can be painful, uncomfortable, and frustrating. It isn’t a wise choice to try to learn healing from someone around whom you feel that way.

I don’t enroll any students until I’ve had a phone call or video conversation with them, or an in-person meeting if that’s feasible. That’s the best way I’ve found to make sure we’re a fit energetically and as instructor and student. If I don’t feel that someone’s a good fit with me, I tell them and offer them resources to find a different instructor.

Learning energy healing can be very rewarding, and it can be fun as well. But it’s important to make sure you know what you’re getting into, and with whom you’re getting into it.

I have two openings for students currently. If you’re interested in finding out more, please go to the Chios instruction page to sign up for an inquiry call.

Teaching

At Rites of Spring this year, I did a Level 1 Chios(R) Energy Healing workshop, as I mentioned a week or so ago. It was a great experience. I really enjoyed working with the eight students who attended. I felt confident about my teaching, and liked seeing the students understanding the concepts and feeling the energy flow for themselves.

That reminded me of how much I used to love teaching. I was a certified special education teacher years ago. I worked as a teacher, aide, or substitute over the course of about sixteen years, working in every public school grade level at one time or another. I got out of teaching because bureaucracy and paperwork were interfering with the reason I wanted to teach in the first place: working with students. I also moved from Maine to Massachusetts, and couldn’t get my certification transferred without going back to school to get an advanced degree, something I didn’t feel inclined to do.

I tried substitute teaching after I moved, because I didn’t need certification for that, but it was only about a month after I’d had major surgery. I wasn’t physically or mentally recovered enough to deal with a day of teaching, and the experience ended up being so negative I chose not to try again.

That was the last time I really taught anything. I’ve done informal “teaching” in that sometimes I end up educating people I know in person or online about certain things, but that’s been about it until the Chios workshop.

I loved teaching that. I loved seeing the excitement of my students as they learned and practiced the techniques. I’m already planning to offer the workshop again next year, and I can’t wait.

I want to teach more. And I’m planning to. I’m taking private Chios students now (see the Chios page for more info), and I’ll be offering the workshop through some area community ed programs. I’m also putting together an 8-week class using A Story You Tell Yourself, which I’m planning to do through community ed first and then maybe in other venues, including possibly online.

I’ve known since the River Flow part of my journey began that teaching and speaking were meant to be part of my path. I’m really excited to be figuring out how!

Studying

I’ve been doing a lot of studying over the past few months. So much that some of it kind of leaks out of my brain. It’s a good thing I take notes!

When I was in school, studying was something I tried to avoid at all costs. I didn’t care about the things my teachers were trying to drill into my head, so I sat in class and mostly listened, took notes if I thought I should (or if the teacher required note-taking as part of the grade), and pretty much took tests from that. I often did homework the morning it was due, as I sat in the school cafeteria chatting with my friends.

The traditional school structure didn’t work for me. I didn’t fit in as a student, or as a peer. I wanted to do and learn my own things in my own way.

As an adult, fortunately, I have that option. I’m taking some courses, but they’re online home study courses that move at the pace at which I decide to move. I’m reading a lot of books and taking notes about the things that resonate for me, or things that I believe will be beneficial for me to know.

I wish I’d had the option to learn this way when I was in school. For years, I daydreamed about starting a school where kids could do exactly that: Learn at their own pace in ways that made sense to them.

There are schools like that in existence, and may well have been when I was growing up. Some forms of homeschooling, such as unschooling, operate on exactly that concept.

I hope someday it’s widely recognized that people are not cookies cut from the same cutter. We learn in different ways, and have different interests and needs. One thing we do have in common, though: We can all succeed if we’re given the right tools and opportunities. I wish that happened more often.